One of the attributes of growth and evolution in a democratic state is how it chooses to view the issue of representation. In Africa, an inclusive political landscape reflects this phenomenon and adequate representation post colonialism has gradually shifted in the favour of women. Given that Africa has some perspectives that challenge representation such as culture and religion which are predominantly patriarchal in nature, the continent and its political counterparts have actively ensured adequate representation.

Engagement and participation of women post colonialism has grown over the years. Africa is said to have the largest female participation, with Rwanda having 64% female representation in legislative seats. In countries such as South Africa and Senegal, 40% of parliamentary seats are held by women. On an executive level, women have also been elected as presidents. There have been 9 female presidents since 1993 and 12 female vice presidents. Furthermore, 50% of African Union Parliamentary seats are held by women. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, who was a former Minister in South Africa took over as President of the African Union commission in 2012. Furthermore, women are said to be taking over more “serious” ministerial positions such as Defens and Finance as compared to those viewed as “softer” ministerial positions such as Social Development. In South Africa, the minister of Defense is a female.

(PICTURE: www.dod.mil.za - Ms Lindiwe Sisulu)

Such patterns and dynamics reflect the evolution of representation on a political level in Africa, and redressing gender based imbalances of the past. As it stands, Africa has the highest level of female representation in terms of leadership and politics, as compared to other continents

Such patterns and dynamics reflect the evolution of representation on a political level in Africa, and redressing gender based imbalances of the past. As it stands, Africa has the highest level of female representation in terms of leadership and politics, as compared to other continents. The question is, does the dynamic that exists within the political arena translate into other spheres such as the corporate sector? How does this influence how young African women venture into other spheres of influence and how they view themselves as future global leaders? How much of the political landscape of Africa is reflective of what Africa is currently in terms of female representation?

(PICTURE: cdn.cnbcafrica.com - Folorunsho Alakija) 

According to the McKinsey & Company Women Matter Africa report released recently, in the corporate sector, 5% of CEOs in the private sector in Africa are women, compared to 4% globally. Furthermore, Earnings before Interest and Taxes (EBIT) for companies with at least a quarter share of women on boards was on average 20% higher than the industry average. This reflects on the very nature of representation in that it does not flow to other spheres of influence, and calls for a more robust approach in terms of facilitating it actively in civil society.

(PICTURE: www.worldaffairsjournal.org - Fatima-Zahra Mansouri)

Politics cannot be the only measure that positively reflects on the issue of representation. There is a plethora of socio economic issues that hamper growth and representation on a continental level including gender based violence which is on the rise in Africa, including child marriages. Statistics show that 39% of girls in sub-Saharan Africa are married before the age of 18.

It’s been a long journey post colonialism and socio economic issues have been on the rise since. Women are still seen as the lesser and weaker vessel, and this is reflective on a socio economic level despite efforts to redress representation, which reflects across the political landscape of Africa.

The ground need to be prepared for future leaders to rise and this means robustly dealing with socio economic issues to accommodate, include, protect, and represent women.


(PICTURE: www.clubmadrid.org / google.co.za)

 

Wisconsin-Madison, “Women and Politics in Africa Today” http://democracyinafrica.org/women-politics-africa-today/ (07 July 2017).

Lameez Omarjee, “Only 5% of CEOs in Africa are women – McKinsey” http://www.fin24.com/Special-Reports/Womens-Month-2016/only-5-of-ceos-in-africa-are-women-mckinsey-20160810 (07 July 2017).

“Child marriages in sub-Saharan Africa” http://www.girlsnotbrides.org/region/sub-saharan-africa/ (07 July 2017).